Alan Williams

Abstract

Some experiments on quenching and tempering were carried out on a sample of modern ultra-pure steel and two specimens of 16th century armour, to observe changes in hardness with time at low tempering temperatures. The hardness of the specimens of armour fell more rapidly than might have been expected by com parison with modern steels. This has suggested a reason why gilding was found to be a difficult process to combine with hardening by armourers.

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Keywords
References
Anheuser K 1997, ‘Fire-gilding on European Plate armour of the 16th century’, Bulletin of the Metals Museum of Japan (Sendai) 28, 27-39.
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Williams A R 1986, ‘Fifteenth century armour from Churburg; a metallographic study’, Armi Antiche 32, 3-81.
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Williams A R and de Reuck A 1995, The Royal Armoury at Greenwich, 1515-1649 (London).
Williams A R in press, ‘The steel of the Negroli’, Metropolitan Museum Journal 34.
How to Cite
Experiments with ’medieval steel’ plates. (2022). Historical Metallurgy, 32(2), 82-86. https://www.hmsjournal.org/index.php/home/article/view/309
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Articles